A Diasporan Experience at Work

Job are hard to get these days and when you land on one you want to give it your best, as being a weak performer or under delivering is unacceptable and can threaten your continued employment.

What is even worse today is when you are very good at your job..and at the same time you happen to be a Diasporan this is a perfect recipe for double stress. It is potentially dangerous. A boss who is insecure, paranoid and feels threatened by your competency because they cannot deliver the goods like you do, can make your life at work hell.

Being too ambitious makes you the biggest threat in their career path. You become a threat bigger than them getting a redundancy package, because your ambition endangers their career path and future financial security.

Worse still is when you have a racist boss, one who cannot understand how you can be better than them. As a Diasporan you have to work twice as much to be recognised for your work, you cannot pin point the discrimination but it there, you see it, you feel it, they discriminate on you in all manners, office politics and fake smiles makes one contemplate quitting on the spot….but when you remember where you are coming from and the responsibilities on your shoulders …you then have no options but to develop a thick skin and turn a blind eye.

Being too good and competent in your job can land you a bad appraisal, an appraisal with intentions of tearing you into pieces, one that will marginalise your contribution to the institution you work for and endanger your career progression, bad enough to make you so mad that you will be forced to resign in protest, but being so far away from home you put your head down and soldier on…

Being your own boss is a dream for many, a dream many have achieved and enjoying that freedom.

By Esther Wairumbi. Esther is a Banker/Enterprenuer based in the United Kingdom. She also writes the estherwairumbi.blogspot.co.uk blog.

Disclaimer: The views expressed on this op-ed/blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the opinions of Mwakilishi News Media, or any other individual, organization, or institution. The content on this op-ed/blog is not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, or individual. The author himself is responsible for the content of the posts on this op-ed/blog, not any other organization or institution which he might be seen to represent. The author is not responsible, nor will he be held liable, for any statements made by others on this op-ed/blog in the op-ed blog comments, nor the laws which they may break in this country or their own, through their comments’ content, implication, and intent. The author reserves the right to delete comments if and when necessary. The author is not responsible for the content or activities of any sites linked from this op-ed/blog. Unless otherwise indicated, all translations and other content on here are original works of the op-ed/blog author and the copyrights for those works belong to the author.

Original Author: 
Esther Wairumbi
sue's picture

That soundS like me at my work place. nice blog. Highlitghting what most of us go thru in diaspora.

We need more of this so we dont feel alone at work.

sue's picture

Well said. As a diaspora you go through alot of stress ,and everyone at home expect your cash without a clue of what we go thru in diaspora.

Being in the diaspora has tought me a lot,that home is the best. I walked out of a job because of discrimination and the next one was the same so i decided to stay.

I love this blog as it encourages me.

sue's picture

Tell me about it ...thats make 3 of us ....so far!

After a long struggle of going to college and settle everything by yourself, I stlll have to undergo bitter stressful of avoiding losing a job.

And here I'm planning for my 2 kids to come from Africa to join me!

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